Sock Affairs

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Even if you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past decades, chances are you’d still recognise one of music’s most iconic images of all time. The lightning record (aka Aladdin Sane) is 50 years young this year (2023), and though it’s far from Bowie’s other moments of genius, its artwork will live on as a masterpiece of pop culture.
£13
Steven Rhodes’s works are born from his dual love of retro nostalgia and pitch-black humour.
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Between 1968 and 1982, Aubrey Powell and Storm Thorgerson designed almost 200 rock album covers under the name “Hipgnosis”. Only one of those would be recognised by as many as “The best album of all time”. It was launched in 1973 as Pink Floyd's 8th studio work, one of the most influential names of the Progressive Rock movement. Over a dark background, a beam of light is dispersed by a triangular prism that represents the band. Just as with light, the sound is apparently simple, yet wonderfully complex.
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"Nazi Punks Fuck Off" is the fifth single by Dead Kennedys. It was released in 1981 on Alternative Tentacles with "Moral Majority" as the B-side. Both are from the In God We Trust, Inc. EP, although the EP version is a different recording from the single version. The single included a free armband with a crossed-out swastika. The design was later adopted as a symbol for the anti-racist punk movement Anti-Racist Action.
£11
When jazz first emerged it quickly became one of the most influential musical genres of its time. So swing to the rhythm of life, pull out those jazz hands and strut your stuff in these jazzy socks.
£11
From button pushers to virtuoso scratchers, the DJ is a guy who looks at a crowd of wasted, often obnoxious partygoers and thinks 'let's see if these eager audiophiles can appreciate the delicate intricacies of my carefully prepared act!' and then gets up on stage. A craft that sometimes gets a bad rap, but that at one point or another we all can't live without.
£13
Steven Rhodes’s works are born from his dual love of retro nostalgia and pitch-black humour.
£13
Steven Rhodes’s works are born from his dual love of retro nostalgia and pitch-black humour.
£11
Channel the power of propaganda art with a design inspired by iconic posters such as the 1943 “We Can Do It!”. Originally used to discourage labour unrest and inspire female workers to join the war effort, the poster has since been repurposed to unite women in the fight for equality. These socks make a fashion statement whilst also making a statement about what you stand for. Spread positivity with each step of your everyday life with these unique socks!
£11
Reggae music emerged in Jamaica in the late 1960s and quickly gained popularity worldwide. Reggae's heavy basslines, off-beat rhythms, and syncopated melodies have influenced many other music genres, including hip-hop and EDM. Through its ability to connect people and promote social and political change, reggae music still remains a powerful force to this day. So, march to the beat of your own drum with these peaceful socks!
£11
A very long time ago, music fans listened to something called cassette tapes. At that time we also had "pencils" that we're mostly used for "writing" and, as fate would have it, fitted perfectly in the tape reels. This ultimate lifehack allowed you to rewind tapes without blowing your walkman's batteries. Or, when the tape came out of the cassette, once again the mighty pencil, would come to the rescue to save your precious music. What a time to be alive!
£11
In 1967, India's sounds and culture was all the rage in the music world. So, Jimi Hendrix's label thought it would be a great idea to portray him (and the Experience) as an Indian deity, thus managing to piss off both Jimi, who found it insensitive towards his Native American heritage and the Hindu community who saw it has profanity. Despite the backfire, it still became one of the most iconic representations of Hendrix.